I'm Claudia. I collect fashion, design, and pop culture commentary here. See my work over here.

"

So we must protect and respect each other, no matter how hard it feels. No matter how wrong someone else may seem to us, they are still human. No matter how bad someone may appear, they are truly no worse than us. Our beliefs and behavior don’t make us fundamentally better than others, no matter how satisfying it is to believe otherwise. We must be tireless in our efforts to see things from the point of view we most disagree with. We must make endless efforts to try and understand the people we least relate to. And we must at all times force ourselves to love the people we dislike the most. Not because it’s nice or because they deserve it, but because our own sanity and survival depends on it. And if we do find ourselves pushed into a corner where we must kill others in order to survive, we must fully accept that we are killing people just as fully human as ourselves, and not some evil abstract creatures.

Love your dad because he’s your father, because he made you, because he thinks for himself, and most of all because he is a person. Have the strength to doubt and question what you believe as easily as you’re so quick to doubt his beliefs. Live with a truly open mind — the kind of open mind that even questions the idea of an open mind. Don’t feel the need to always pick a side. And if you do pick a side, pick the side of love. It remains our only real hope for survival and has more power to save us than any other belief we could ever cling to.

Your friend,
Andrew W.K.

"
yeji-draws-yeti:

MASTERMIND exhibition16 February - 18 March 2012Brixton Village, London
BOLT editions curated, organized and printed a group exhibition of 22 artists. 
The exhibition is currently showing as part of the BRIXTON VILLAGE ART TRAIL in 10 different shops and cafes throughout Brixton Village – SW9 8PR.
All Risograph prints are available to buy in the shops as well as on the website.


!!!

yeji-draws-yeti:

MASTERMIND exhibition
16 February - 18 March 2012
Brixton Village, London

BOLT editions curated, organized and printed a group exhibition of 22 artists. 

The exhibition is currently showing as part of the BRIXTON VILLAGE ART 
TRAIL in 10 different shops and cafes throughout Brixton Village – SW9 8PR.

All Risograph prints are available to buy in the shops as well as on the website.

!!!

timoni:

The Ping-Pong Theory of Tech Sexism, by Ariel Schrag.
This interview is the best reflection I’ve read of how I feel being a woman in the tech industry. I get more respect than a lot of my female coworkers, being on the product side and somewhat technically aware, but I don’t get guy-level respect. My ideas are routinely ignored, or ascribed to other male coworkers.
I know my coworkers aren’t consciously doing this. Calling them out on it is, for the most part, pointless: it will be seen as irrational, overly sensitive, or aggressive. And yet, when I talk to other women, we do generally feel like our expertise isn’t valued, that we have to justify our arguments beyond reason, and that our challenges are simply ignored. It may not be sexism: we may really all just be worse at our jobs. But I doubt it.
So I like the approach this interview takes. No judgements, no sense that men are consciously to blame, just a clear, honest description of how things have been for this particular women during her career.

Well phrased!

timoni:

The Ping-Pong Theory of Tech Sexism, by Ariel Schrag.

This interview is the best reflection I’ve read of how I feel being a woman in the tech industry. I get more respect than a lot of my female coworkers, being on the product side and somewhat technically aware, but I don’t get guy-level respect. My ideas are routinely ignored, or ascribed to other male coworkers.

I know my coworkers aren’t consciously doing this. Calling them out on it is, for the most part, pointless: it will be seen as irrational, overly sensitive, or aggressive. And yet, when I talk to other women, we do generally feel like our expertise isn’t valued, that we have to justify our arguments beyond reason, and that our challenges are simply ignored. It may not be sexism: we may really all just be worse at our jobs. But I doubt it.

So I like the approach this interview takes. No judgements, no sense that men are consciously to blame, just a clear, honest description of how things have been for this particular women during her career.

Well phrased!

austinkleon:


Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Currey

“Sooner or later, the great men turn out to be all alike. They never stop working. They never lose a minute. It is very depressing.” —V.S. Pritchett
“A modern stoic knows that the surest way to discipline passion is to discipline time: decide what you want or ought to do during the day, then always do it at exactly the same moment every day, and passion will give you no trouble.” —W.H. Auden

An addictive read—just 1-3 page summaries of the routines of various artists, scientists, etc. It’s fun to go through and get ideas for your own work, but mostly it’s just fascinating to hear about how people work(ed). (cf. Studs Turkel’s Working.)
Here are a few bits that rang true to my own experience:
A little bit of work every day adds up.
Anthony Trollope: “three hours a day will produce as much as a man ought to write.”
Martin Amis: “Two hours. I think most writers would be very happy with two hours of concentrated work.”
Gertrude Stein: “If you write a half hour a day it makes a lot of writing year by year.”
Read your work aloud.
Simply reading your work aloud gives you enough distance from it that you can hear what’s really going on. Mark Twain would read his day’s work aloud to his family after dinner. Maya Angelou would read her stuff to her husband, but not invite him to comment. (Quentin Tarantino does the same—he reads scripts to his friends, but doesn’t invite feedback. “I don’t want your input, heavens forbid…”)
Eat a good breakfast.
I’d like to adopt Carl Jung’s breakfast: “coffee, salami, fruits, bread and butter.”
A little procrastination can go a long way.
Gerhard Richter: “I love making plans. I could spend my life arranging things. Weeks go by, and I don’t paint until I can’t stand it any longer…perhaps I create these little crises as a kind of secret strategy to push myself.”
Joseph Heller: “Television drove me back to Catch-22. I couldn’t imagine what Americans did at night when they weren’t writing novels.”
Pressure makes you get the work done.
Edward Abbey: “I hate commitments, obligations and working under pressure. But on the other hand, I like getting paid in advance and I only work under pressure.”
Go for walks.
Charles Dickens took a 3-hour walks every day at 2PM, “searching for some pictures I wanted to build upon.”
Wallace Stevens commuted on foot three or four miles in between his house and his day job, and took an hour long walk at lunch. He composed his poems on these walks, scribbling on envelopes he had stuffed in his pockets.
Here are some other random bits I found interesting:
Francis Bacon would read cookbooks in bed to fall asleep.
Morton Feldman on what John Cage taught him: “He said that it’s a very good idea that after you write a little bit, stop and then copy it. Because while you’re copying it, you’re thinking about it, and it’s giving you other ideas. And that’s the way I work. And it’s marvelous, just wonderful, the relationship between working and copying.”
Here are some great quotes:
Gustave Flaubert: “It’s no easy business to be simple.“
Woody Allen: “I think in the cracks all the time. I never stop.”
Glenn Gould: “I don’t approve of people who watch television, but I am one of them.”
Phillip Roth: “I’m like a doctor and it’s an emergency room. And I’m the emergency.”
Stephen Jay Gould: “It’s not work, it’s my life. It’s what I do. It’s what I like to do.”
Bernard Malamud: “The real mystery to crack is you
Funny enough, out of all the routines, I thought Georgia O’Keefe’s was the most lovely. She lived out in the New Mexico desert and got up every morning to watch the sun come up…
I do wonder about the book’s structure. At first, I could see the way Currey was DJing, the juxtapositions he was trying to make, but later on things got a little random. One thing I liked about his blog was that you could click tags to read about artists with different habits: procrastinators, early risers, nap takers, etc. But that’s the nature of the beast when you translate an essentially non-linear, fluid database into a linear, fixed form like a book…
Anyways, it’s a fun read.
Filed under: routine, my reading year 2013

austinkleon:

Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Currey

“Sooner or later, the great men turn out to be all alike. They never stop working. They never lose a minute. It is very depressing.”
—V.S. Pritchett

“A modern stoic knows that the surest way to discipline passion is to discipline time: decide what you want or ought to do during the day, then always do it at exactly the same moment every day, and passion will give you no trouble.”
—W.H. Auden

An addictive read—just 1-3 page summaries of the routines of various artists, scientists, etc. It’s fun to go through and get ideas for your own work, but mostly it’s just fascinating to hear about how people work(ed). (cf. Studs Turkel’s Working.)


Here are a few bits that rang true to my own experience:

A little bit of work every day adds up.

Anthony Trollope: “three hours a day will produce as much as a man ought to write.”

Martin Amis: “Two hours. I think most writers would be very happy with two hours of concentrated work.”

Gertrude Stein: “If you write a half hour a day it makes a lot of writing year by year.”

Read your work aloud.

Simply reading your work aloud gives you enough distance from it that you can hear what’s really going on. Mark Twain would read his day’s work aloud to his family after dinner. Maya Angelou would read her stuff to her husband, but not invite him to comment. (Quentin Tarantino does the same—he reads scripts to his friends, but doesn’t invite feedback. “I don’t want your input, heavens forbid…”)

Eat a good breakfast.

I’d like to adopt Carl Jung’s breakfast: “coffee, salami, fruits, bread and butter.”

A little procrastination can go a long way.

Gerhard Richter: “I love making plans. I could spend my life arranging things. Weeks go by, and I don’t paint until I can’t stand it any longer…perhaps I create these little crises as a kind of secret strategy to push myself.”

Joseph Heller: “Television drove me back to Catch-22. I couldn’t imagine what Americans did at night when they weren’t writing novels.”

Pressure makes you get the work done.

Edward Abbey: “I hate commitments, obligations and working under pressure. But on the other hand, I like getting paid in advance and I only work under pressure.”

Go for walks.

Charles Dickens took a 3-hour walks every day at 2PM, “searching for some pictures I wanted to build upon.”

Wallace Stevens commuted on foot three or four miles in between his house and his day job, and took an hour long walk at lunch. He composed his poems on these walks, scribbling on envelopes he had stuffed in his pockets.


Here are some other random bits I found interesting:

  • Francis Bacon would read cookbooks in bed to fall asleep.
  • Morton Feldman on what John Cage taught him: “He said that it’s a very good idea that after you write a little bit, stop and then copy it. Because while you’re copying it, you’re thinking about it, and it’s giving you other ideas. And that’s the way I work. And it’s marvelous, just wonderful, the relationship between working and copying.”

Here are some great quotes:

  • Gustave Flaubert: “It’s no easy business to be simple.“
  • Woody Allen: “I think in the cracks all the time. I never stop.”
  • Glenn Gould: “I don’t approve of people who watch television, but I am one of them.”
  • Phillip Roth: “I’m like a doctor and it’s an emergency room. And I’m the emergency.”
  • Stephen Jay Gould: “It’s not work, it’s my life. It’s what I do. It’s what I like to do.”
  • Bernard Malamud: “The real mystery to crack is you

Funny enough, out of all the routines, I thought Georgia O’Keefe’s was the most lovely. She lived out in the New Mexico desert and got up every morning to watch the sun come up…

I do wonder about the book’s structure. At first, I could see the way Currey was DJing, the juxtapositions he was trying to make, but later on things got a little random. One thing I liked about his blog was that you could click tags to read about artists with different habits: procrastinators, early risers, nap takers, etc. But that’s the nature of the beast when you translate an essentially non-linear, fluid database into a linear, fixed form like a book…

Anyways, it’s a fun read.

Filed under: routine, my reading year 2013

andyjmllr:

5 Reasons Getting to Know Yourself is the Key to Finding Your Artistic Voice1. Understanding what moves you helps you move others!This video was shared with me by my friend John Stanbury from Advice to Sink in Slowly (who I made this print for). It’s basically about the old ‘write what you know’ idea but clarifying it from writing what you know circumstantially, to what you emotionally know. When you identify the moments in your life when you ‘felt the most’ (either from life or from media) you can start to develop an emotional palette for your work. For me a lot of what I work with is childhood over the top melancholy(!) (thinks Charlie Brown Christmas and Fraggle Rock) and absurd humor (The Muppets and Spongebob)2. Knowing your personality type helps you play to your strengths!Some people hate the myers-briggs test, and I’m not one of those people. There are problems with personality tests, but don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. I suggest taking this personality test here.  Take that result, the 4 letter archetype, and read about it online. This helped me realize I prefer to lean towards evoking emotion in my work rather than engage thinking. Huge in my development!3. Realize the differences between you and your influences!In college I discovered a lot of work that moved me so much that I just felt defeated that I hadn’t made it. It felt like I was looking at work I would have made based on my life and personality! Learning about myself helped me realize all the ways I am unique and different from all other designers out there that inspire me, then I focused and pushed hard into my differences to set myself apart as much as possible.4. Finding what’s important to you enriches your artistic voice!I suggest writing a list of the things that are most important to you. Write a top ten list of the most important people to you, movies, books, beliefs, etc. The more you write and identify the more you can inject it into your work. When you start finding these things and injecting them into your work the easier for people to relate to your work because it gains authenticity. This adds nuance and humanity to your artistic voice.5. Knowing where you want to go gives you focus!When you take time to understand who you really are you start to get a sense of where you want to go. When you understand where you would like to be in 5, 10, 15 years you start to understand what type of work you should be doing. For instance, if you really want to be making your own graphic novels in 5 years you shouldn’t be spending all your time trying to develop a style that works best on t-shirts.

I love re-reading Andy posts. Thank you Mr. Miller!

andyjmllr:

5 Reasons Getting to Know Yourself is the Key to Finding Your Artistic Voice

1. Understanding what moves you helps you move others!
This video was shared with me by my friend John Stanbury from Advice to Sink in Slowly (who I made this print for). It’s basically about the old ‘write what you know’ idea but clarifying it from writing what you know circumstantially, to what you emotionally know. When you identify the moments in your life when you ‘felt the most’ (either from life or from media) you can start to develop an emotional palette for your work. For me a lot of what I work with is childhood over the top melancholy(!) (thinks Charlie Brown Christmas and Fraggle Rock) and absurd humor (The Muppets and Spongebob)


2. Knowing your personality type helps you play to your strengths!
Some people hate the myers-briggs test, and I’m not one of those people. There are problems with personality tests, but don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. I suggest taking this personality test here.  Take that result, the 4 letter archetype, and read about it online. This helped me realize I prefer to lean towards evoking emotion in my work rather than engage thinking. Huge in my development!


3. Realize the differences between you and your influences!
In college I discovered a lot of work that moved me so much that I just felt defeated that I hadn’t made it. It felt like I was looking at work I would have made based on my life and personality! Learning about myself helped me realize all the ways I am unique and different from all other designers out there that inspire me, then I focused and pushed hard into my differences to set myself apart as much as possible.


4. Finding what’s important to you enriches your artistic voice!
I suggest writing a list of the things that are most important to you. Write a top ten list of the most important people to you, movies, books, beliefs, etc. The more you write and identify the more you can inject it into your work. When you start finding these things and injecting them into your work the easier for people to relate to your work because it gains authenticity. This adds nuance and humanity to your artistic voice.


5. Knowing where you want to go gives you focus!
When you take time to understand who you really are you start to get a sense of where you want to go. When you understand where you would like to be in 5, 10, 15 years you start to understand what type of work you should be doing. For instance, if you really want to be making your own graphic novels in 5 years you shouldn’t be spending all your time trying to develop a style that works best on t-shirts.

I love re-reading Andy posts. Thank you Mr. Miller!

"When they throw the water on the witch, she says, ‘Who would have thought good little girl like you could destroy my beautiful wickedness?’ That line inspired my life. I sometimes say it to myself before I go to sleep like a prayer."
-John Waters on The Wizard of Oz (via austinkleon)
"Psychologically, the repercussions of open offices are relatively straightforward. Physical barriers have been closely linked to psychological privacy, and a sense of privacy boosts job performance. Open offices also remove an element of control, which can lead to feelings of helplessness. In a 2005 study that looked at organizations ranging from a Midwest auto supplier to a Southwest telecom firm, researchers found that the ability to control the environment had a significant effect on team cohesion and satisfaction. When workers couldn’t change the way that things looked, adjust the lighting and temperature, or choose how to conduct meetings, spirits plummeted."
-

The Open-Office Trap : The New Yorker

While I prefer working from home, and don’t love open offices, I am genuinely surprised at this article’s conclusions.

(via timoni)

procrastinaut:

Front404 celebrates the birthday of George Orwell by putting party hats on security cameras around Utrecht. “By making these inconspicuous cameras that we ignore in our daily lives catch the eye again we also create awareness of how many cameras really watch us nowadays, and that the surveillance state described by Orwell is getting closer and closer to reality.” More here: George Orwell’s Birthday Party FRONT404 Via BoingBoing.
(An earlier Front404 project involved “camera birds – city birds with cameras instead of heads.”)

This!

procrastinaut:

Front404 celebrates the birthday of George Orwell by putting party hats on security cameras around Utrecht. “By making these inconspicuous cameras that we ignore in our daily lives catch the eye again we also create awareness of how many cameras really watch us nowadays, and that the surveillance state described by Orwell is getting closer and closer to reality.” More here: George Orwell’s Birthday Party FRONT404 Via BoingBoing.

(An earlier Front404 project involved “camera birds – city birds with cameras instead of heads.”)

This!